SUMMER TERM

Summer break - or summer breakthrough?

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May 14, 2018:
Summer Term begins. Summer Term runs May 14 – August 12. Session lengths vary. Listed are examples of popular 3, 4 and 8 week sessions.

• 4-week session: 5/21 – 6/17
• 3-week session: 5/29 – 6/17
• 8-week session: 6/18 – 8/12
• 4-week session: 6/18 – 7/15
• 4-week session: 7/16 – 8/12

Calendar

High school students can earn college credit at UW-Madison this summer

You can apply to take UW-Madison classes during Summer Term during your junior or senior year of high school. If admitted as a University Special student, you’ll earn college credit for face-to-face and online courses. To apply, your GPA must be at least 3.000 overall and in the most recent semester of high school. Your guidance counselor must also recommend you for Summer Term. A  residential program is coming in summer 2018.  Click here to sign up to receive more information about the 2018 residential program.

• What is Summer Term?
• Is Summer Term right for you?
• Next steps
• Noncredit programs for high school students

 

What is Summer Term?

Summer Term is a regular academic term, but it moves at a faster pace. Prestigious UW-Madison faculty teach each course with the highest level of academic rigor. Course formats include lectures, where an instructor presents course material to the entire class; discussions, where students study course material in interactive, teacher-led groups; and labs, where students participate in hands-on activities such as science experiments.

 

Is Summer Term right for you?

If you enroll in Summer Term, you must be ready to focus on your studies, apply yourself, and seek out help when you need it. Think through your goals, as well as your financial situation, schedule, and several other factors before applying. Here are four areas to consider:

  • Academic preparedness and maturity: Are you ready to take a college course along with experienced college students? Are you prepared to take responsibility for your academic plans and your performance in the course? The answer to both questions should be yes. As a University Special student, you’ll establish a permanent record at UW-Madison, including a transcript college admissions officers may view when considering your applications. Plus, if you become a UW-Madison undergraduate, your undergrad GPA will include grades from all courses you take as a University Special student. Meet with your guidance counselor to make sure the academic rigor and accelerated pace of Summer Term are a good fit for you.
  • Accelerated pace: Summer Term courses high school students can take are typically eight weeks long. Their pace can be two to three times faster than those of UW-Madison’s fall or spring classes. You’ll need to make summer courses a priority and manage your time accordingly. Expect to spend 15-18 hours per week completing homework for each eight-week, three-credit course, whether it’s face-to-face or online. (See sidebar for more on how to succeed during Summer Term.)
  • Financial considerations: Talk to your family to see if you can afford tuition and fees for Summer Term. Financial aid is not available for high school students during Summer Term.
  • Schedule considerations: Most courses have both a lecture and a lab or discussion, both of which may not take place at the same time of day. Certain courses require students to meet outside of class, sometimes during the evening. Final exams don’t take place at the regular course meeting time, so you’ll need to make sure you’re available at the exam time listed in the Schedule of Classes. Also consider your commute to and from campus if you’re interested in a face-to-face course.

 

Next steps

  • Talk your high school guidance counselor about your interest in Summer Term.
  • Review available courses. UW-Madison offers an array of courses during Summer Term.  However, they may not be feasible for high school students based on required pre-requisites or because they are offered while high school is still in session.  Below is a list of on campus courses without pre-requisites that are held in June, July or August.
Subject Course Number Course Title
Asian American Studies 101 Introduction to Asian American Studies
Atmospheric & Oceanic Studies 102 Climate & Climate Change
Botany 260 Introductory Ecology
Chicana/o & Latina/o Studies 245 Chicana and Latina History
Classics 320 The Greeks
Consumer Science 173 Consuming Happiness
Communication Arts 100 Introduction to Speech Composition
Comparative Literature 203 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Literary Forms: I Love Livin in the City: Punk, Comix, Avantgardes
East Asian Languages & Literature 123 Elementary Japanese
Environmental Studies 113 Environmental Studies: The Humanistic Perspective
Environmental Studies 260 Introductory Ecology
Folklore Program 100 Introduction to Folklore
Folklore Program 103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World
French 101 First Semester French
French 102 Second Semester French
Gender & Women’s Studies 245 Chicana and Latina History
Geography 101 Introduction to Human Geography
Geoscience 110 Evolution & Extinction
German 101 First Semester German
History 213 Jews & American Pop Culture
History 245 Chicana and Latina History
Italian 101 First Semester Italian
Jewish Studies 213 Jews & American Pop Culture
Kinesiology 235 Human Physiology & Health
Landscape Architecture 250 Survey of Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture 260 History of Landscape Architecture
Literature in Translation 275 In Translation: The Tales of Hans Christian Andersen
Music 103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World
Music 113 Music in Performance
Religious Studies 173 Consuming Happiness
Slavic Languages 101 First Semester Russian
Sociology 120 Marriage & Family
Sociology 134 Problems of American Racial & Ethnic Minorities
Sociology 138 The Sociology of Gender
Zoology 230 Introductory Ecology

 

Noncredit programs for high school students

Interested in participating in a UW-Madison program this summer – but not looking to earn college credit? Here are some exciting noncredit opportunities the university offers teens over the summer:

Residential opportunities:

  • Summer Music Clinic: Polish your performance skills with other high school musicians in band, orchestra, choir, musical theater groups, or jazz ensembles at this on-campus program, which culminates in a day of concerts.
  • Theatre Camp: This program for high schoolers focuses on theatrical lighting, sound, stage management, and design principles through hands-on activities at UW-Madison’s Memorial Union.

Non-Residential opportunities:

  • Accelerated Learning Program (ALP): Offered by the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth (WCATY), this popular program offers gifted students opportunities to take challenging courses throughout the state.
  • Greater Madison Writing Program: A partnership between UW-Madison and Madison-area teachers, this program offers writing programs for youth throughout the community, including a popular High School Writing Camp.
  • Precollege Programs: Designed for students in grades 1-12, these programs provide instruction in subjects ranging from music to foreign languages to sports on a variety of UW campuses, including UW-Madison.

How to succeed during Summer Term

1

Prioritize your courses when you’re making plans. It’s okay to have a summer job and a social life, but don’t let these things distract you from your studies.

2

Buy your books and review course basics before the first day of class.

3

Attend every class session. Since Summer Term courses move so quickly, missing just one class can be detrimental.

4

Ask questions early and often to make sure you’re understanding the course material.

5

Consider forming a study group with classmates in addition to studying on your own.

6

Schedule time to study each day, or at least a few times a week. You may need up to 18 hours a week to complete readings, problem sets, and other types of assignment.

High School Students

You can apply to take UW-Madison classes during Summer Term during your junior or senior year of high school.If admitted as a University Special student, you’ll earn college credit for face-to-face and online courses. To apply, your GPA must be at least 3.000 overall and in the most recent semester of high school. Your guidance counselor must also recommend you for Summer Term. A residential program is coming in summer 2018.  Click here to sign up to receive more information about the 2018 residential program.

• What is Summer Term?
• Is Summer Term right for you?
• Next steps
• Noncredit programs for high school students

What is Summer Term?

Summer Term is a regular academic term, but it moves at a faster pace. Prestigious UW-Madison faculty teach each course with the highest level of academic rigor. Course formats include lectures, where an instructor presents course material to the entire class; discussions, where students study course material in interactive, teacher-led groups; and labs, where students participate in hands-on activities such as science experiments.

Is Summer Term right for you?

If you enroll in Summer Term, you must be ready to focus on your studies, apply yourself, and seek out help when you need it. Think through your goals, as well as your financial situation, schedule, and several other factors before applying. Here are four areas to consider:

  • Academic preparedness and maturity: Are you ready to take a college course along with experienced college students? Are you prepared to take responsibility for your academic plans and your performance in the course? The answer to both questions should be yes. As a University Special student, you’ll establish a permanent record at UW-Madison, including a transcript college admissions officers may view when considering your applications. Plus, if you become a UW-Madison undergraduate, your undergrad GPA will include grades from all courses you take as a University Special student. Meet with your guidance counselor to make sure the academic rigor and accelerated pace of Summer Term are a good fit for you.
  • Accelerated pace: Summer Term courses high school students can take are typically eight weeks long. Their pace can be two to three times faster than those of UW-Madison’s fall or spring classes. You’ll need to make summer courses a priority and manage your time accordingly. Expect to spend 15-18 hours per week completing homework for each eight-week, three-credit course, whether it’s face-to-face or online. (See sidebar for more on how to succeed during Summer Term.)
  • Financial considerations: Talk to your family to see if you can afford tuition and fees for Summer Term. Financial aid is not available for high school students during Summer Term.
  • Schedule considerations: Most courses have both a lecture and a lab or discussion, both of which may not take place at the same time of day. Certain courses require students to meet outside of class, sometimes during the evening. Final exams don’t take place at the regular course meeting time, so you’ll need to make sure you’re available at the exam time listed in the Schedule of Classes. Also consider your commute to and from campus if you’re interested in a face-to-face course.

Next steps

  • Talk your high school guidance counselor about your interest in Summer Term.
  • Review available courses. UW-Madison offers an array of courses during Summer Term.  However, they may not be feasible for high school students based on required pre-requisites or because they are offered while high school is still in session.  Below is a list of on campus courses without pre-requisites that are held in June, July or August.
Subject Course Number Course Title
Asian American Studies 101 Introduction to Asian American Studies
Atmospheric & Oceanic Studies 102 Climate & Climate Change
Botany 260 Introductory Ecology
Chicana/o & Latina/o Studies 245 Chicana and Latina History
Classics 320 The Greeks
Consumer Science 173 Consuming Happiness
Communication Arts 100 Introduction to Speech Composition
Comparative Literature 203 Introduction to Cross-Cultural Literary Forms: I Love Livin in the City: Punk, Comix, Avantgardes
East Asian Languages & Literature 123 Elementary Japanese
Environmental Studies 113 Environmental Studies: The Humanistic Perspective
Environmental Studies 260 Introductory Ecology
Folklore Program 100 Introduction to Folklore
Folklore Program 103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World
French 101 First Semester French
French 102 Second Semester French
Gender & Women’s Studies 245 Chicana and Latina History
Geography 101 Introduction to Human Geography
Geoscience 110 Evolution & Extinction
German 101 First Semester German
History 213 Jews & American Pop Culture
History 245 Chicana and Latina History
Italian 101 First Semester Italian
Jewish Studies 213 Jews & American Pop Culture
Kinesiology 235 Human Physiology & Health
Landscape Architecture 250 Survey of Landscape Architecture Design
Landscape Architecture 260 History of Landscape Architecture
Literature in Translation 275 In Translation: The Tales of Hans Christian Andersen
Music 103 Introduction to Music Cultures of the World
Music 113 Music in Performance
Religious Studies 173 Consuming Happiness
Slavic Languages 101 First Semester Russian
Sociology 120 Marriage & Family
Sociology 134 Problems of American Racial & Ethnic Minorities
Sociology 138 The Sociology of Gender
Zoology 230 Introductory Ecology

Noncredit programs for high school students

Interested in participating in a UW-Madison program this summer – but not looking to earn college credit? Here are some exciting noncredit opportunities the university offers teens over the summer:

Residential opportunities:

  • Summer Music Clinic: Polish your performance skills with other high school musicians in band, orchestra, choir, musical theater groups, or jazz ensembles at this on-campus program, which culminates in a day of concerts.
  • Theatre Camp: This program for high schoolers focuses on theatrical lighting, sound, stage management, and design principles through hands-on activities at UW-Madison’s Memorial Union.

Non-Residential opportunities:

  • Accelerated Learning Program (ALP): Offered by the Wisconsin Center for Academically Talented Youth (WCATY), this popular program offers gifted students opportunities to take challenging courses throughout the state.
  • Greater Madison Writing Program: A partnership between UW-Madison and Madison-area teachers, this program offers writing programs for youth throughout the community, including a popular High School Writing Camp.
  • Precollege Programs: Designed for students in grades 1-12, these programs provide instruction in subjects ranging from music to foreign languages to sports on a variety of UW campuses, including UW-Madison.

Calendar

May 14, 2018:
Summer Term begins. Summer Term runs May 14 – August 12. Session lengths vary. Listed are examples of popular 3, 4 and 8 week sessions.

• 4-week session: 5/21 – 6/17
• 3-week session: 5/29 – 6/17
• 8-week session: 6/18 – 8/12
• 4-week session: 6/18 – 7/15
• 4-week session: 7/16 – 8/12

Calendar

How to succeed during Summer Term

1

Prioritize your courses when you’re making plans. It’s okay to have a summer job and a social life, but don’t let these things distract you from your studies.

2

Buy your books and review course basics before the first day of class.

3

Attend every class session. Since Summer Term courses move so quickly, missing just one class can be detrimental.

4

Ask questions early and often to make sure you’re understanding the course material.

5

Consider forming a study group with classmates in addition to studying on your own.

6

Schedule time to study each day, or at least a few times a week. You may need up to 18 hours a week to complete readings, problem sets, and other types of assignment.

 

Scholarships

Available for qualified students

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Enrollment

Enrollment opens in April

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Courses

On campus and online

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